Why retirement is worrying millennials and what steps they are taking

A recent study by HSBC has revealed the main financial worries of the ‘millennial’ generation, recognised as those born between 1980 and 1997. As its title suggests, the ‘Future of Retirement’ survey focuses primarily on how millennials feel about how they are preparing for life after work, but also delves into the wider issues around money and modern life which are inherently linked to the subject.

In general, millennials see themselves as less fortunate than the generations which have come before them. Over half (52%) felt that they had seen weaker economic growth than previous generations, whilst 60% said they saw themselves as experiencing the consequences of decisions made by those older than them, including rising national debt and the global financial crisis. In relation to retirement, 65% of respondents are worried that they will run out of money when they retire, whilst 46% were concerned that employer pension schemes would collapse without any payout for their generation.

The average age that millennials begin saving for their retirement is 27, with just 13% admitting to not having begun putting money away for their pension yet. 76% said that curbing their current spending was difficult but necessary to save for later in life, whilst 68% are willing to do so. When it comes to investment, nearly half of those surveyed (48%) said they would go for a risky opportunity which had the potential for greater returns further down the line.

Expanding out to look at the concerns of all those currently working, which includes both Baby Boomers (those born between 1945 and 1965) and Generation X (born between 1966 and 1979), the survey found that only 17% were worried they wouldn’t be financially comfortable in retirement based on their current savings, with a worrying 14% admitting to having not been able to save anything. However, over half (52%) said they felt that due to the constantly changing financial climate, their current retirement plans would not be relevant.

When asked about back-up plans, around two thirds (67%) of working people said they would continue working in some way after they reached their retirement, whilst more than four fifths of people (82%) said they were intending to retire two years later than originally planned in order to give themselves greater financial stability. 41% also said they wouldn’t mind taking on a second job or working for longer to supplement their pension pot.

The key guidance from HSBC’s research is that starting to save early is the best way to ensure you have sufficient savings to support yourself after you’ve retired. Another key message is the importance of seeking advice, with many people now using technology to plan their retirement: almost half of those surveyed (49%) have used the Internet to research their options, 35% have used online retirement calculators and 27% have contacted advisers online. Online savings accounts are also popular, with 41% saying that they are using one to put money away.